Skip to content

Benedict’s eight years of Papacy: A resignation that left Catholic faithful stunned

February 17, 2013

By Sam Eyoboka

WHEN Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, a German conservative archbishop of the Catholic Church, was elected on April 19, 2005 as the leader of about 1.2 billionCatholics the world over, there was only one thing uppermost in his mind: how to make the world more peaceful.
Benedict XVI is believed to have dedicated his first 12 months to studing essentiallybecause, though he had spent many years in Rome , some mechanisms and functioning of the Curia werenot familiar to him. This explained why, as opposed to many predictions, his Curia was, to a very great extent, that of John Paul II.
The struggle against secularization, renewal of thefaith, the defense of life and the family, the spread of knowledge of Christ — the subjects seem the same, but Benedict XVI’s style was mostly the same as those of his predecessor. Ratzinger was John Paul II’s theologicalpillar for almost 25 years, and, in the last years, there was no important topic, including many appointments, on which he was not consulted.
Pope Benedict XVI AFP Photo.
The style was profoundly different, and it couldn’t be otherwise. John Paul II’s poetic-intuitive tendency is not the analytical-rational one of Benedict XVI; two different paths to arrive at the same objective.
In one of his earliest press interviews after his inauguration, Pope Benedict XVI charged the media to spread peace and exercise responsibility to ensure objective reports that respecthuman dignity and the common good.
The call was similar to the charge Benedict issued April 23, 2005  during a meeting with journalists in his first public audience after being elected pope.
Five years into his pontificate, Benedict’s vision had clearly manifested in twodimensions: creating space for religion in the public sphere and space for God in private lives.
CRISIS OF FAITH
In hundreds of speeches andhomilies, in three encyclicals, on 13 foreign trips, during synods of bishops and even through new web sites, the German pontiff confronted what he called a modern “crisis of faith,” saying the root cause of moral and social ills is a reluctance to acknowledge the truth that comes from God.
To counter this crisis, he proposed Christianity as a religion of love, not rules. Its core mission, he said repeatedly, is to help people accept God’s love and share it, recognizing that true love involves a willingness to make sacrifices.
His emphasis on God as Creator tapped into ecological awareness, for which he’s been dubbed the “Green Pope.” He presented the faith as a path not only tosalvation, but also to social justice and true happiness.
Benedict surprised those who expected a doctrinaire disciplinarian. As a universal pastor, he  led Catholics back to the basics of their faith, catechizing them on Christianity’s foundational practices, writings and beliefs, ranging from the Confessions of St. Augustine to the sign of the cross.
But  Benedict’s quiet teaching mission has been frequently overshadowed by problems and crises that have grabbed headlines, provoked criticism of the church and left the pontiff with an uphill battle to get a hearing.
The fifth anniversary of his election is a case in point. It was viewed by many in the Vatican as an opportunity forthe pope to stand in the media spotlight, underline the essential themes of his pontificate and prepare the world for the second volume of his work, “Jesus of Nazareth.”
But the fallout from the priestly sex abuse crisis has muted the celebratory atmosphere at the Vatican and placed papal aides on the defensive.
In a letter to Irish Catholics inMarch, the pope personally apologized to victims of priestly sexual abuse and announced new steps to heal the wounds of the scandal, including a Vatican investigation and a year of penitential reparation.
Vatican officials viewed the letter as an unprecedented act of transparency by a pope who, even as a cardinal, pushed for harsher penalties against abusers. For critics, however, the papal letter was mere words.Soon the Vatican was denying accusations that the pope himself, as a German archbishop, failed to adequately monitor a priest abuser.
Other controversies have eclipsed the pope’s wider message during his first five years. Visiting his native Bavaria in 2006, he upset many Islamic leaders when he quoted a medieval Byzantine emperor who said the Prophet Mohammed had brought “things only evil andinhuman, such as his command.” To spread the faith by the sword. The pope later said he was merely citing and not endorsing the criticism of Islam, but he conceded that the speech was open to misinterpretation. Then he began a bridge-building effort with Muslim scholars that eventually led to a major new chapter in Vatican-Muslim dialogue.
During a late 2006 visit to Turkey , the pope prayed in Istanbul ‘s Blue Mosque next to an Islamic cleric, a gesture of respect that resonated positively throughout the Islamic world.

Advertisements

From → catholic

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: